Flexstr8 Offers NFC-Enabled Labels for Hazardous Chemicals, Consumer Products

The startup's NFC Smart Label solution is being trialed by companies to track goods, pharmaceuticals, and maintenance and service for industrial equipment.
By Claire Swedberg
Aug 11, 2015

Flexstr8, a smart-label startup based in El Segundo, Calif., has released a Near Field Communication (NFC)-enabled labeling solution for on-demand printing of labels that link NFC readers to data about the labeled products. More than a month ago, the firm launched a solution geared toward consumer products, and last week it released a new, more durable version of its labels (made with Neenah Paper's Kimdura UV inkjet-printable synthetic paper) that can be used in hazardous environments, targeting chemical companies and laboratories. Flexstr8 reports that such businesses can employ the Kimdura label to meet the international Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) requirements for labeling hazardous chemicals. Several consumer product companies, pharmaceutical firms and labs are currently testing the new labels.

In June of this year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) updated the U.S. requirements for the labeling of hazardous chemicals, in accord with the GHS, to require a product identifier, supplier information, a hazard and precautionary statement, and other details to be available regarding each chemical product. Companies that sell such hazardous chemicals must not only print a large amount of information on a label attached to each product's container, but also provide an application sheet to users of that chemical. The application sheet includes directions indicating how to handle and store the product, personal protection requirements, accidental release measures and other precautions.

Flexstr8's NFC RFID labels are made of Neenah Paper's durable Kimdura UV printable synthetic paper.
The Flextr8 NFC Smart Label Solution was released last week to provide a solution by which individuals could use an NFC-enabled smartphone to access a cloud-based database in order to view the chemical-related data normally found on a product's label and application sheet, as required by the GHS and OHSA rules.

Ralph Roessler
Flexstr8 is providing free samples of its smart labels preprogrammed with unique identifiers and data packages for end users, such as those that wish to track chemicals. The full solution would enable customers to print and encode their own labels onsite.

The full NFC Smart Label Solution consists of highly durable NFC labels made of Kimdura UV synthetic paper, an Epson TMC3500 printer, and a Flexstr8 clip-on RFID encoder, as well as Flexstr8 NFC Smart Label Solution software that synchronizes label encoding and printing. The software allows users to utilize the clip-on encoding device to encode the printed label's built-in NXP Semiconductors NTAG203 RFID chip with the user's own desired data, such as a URL that will connect the NFC-enabled device to appropriate information about that product.

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